At St. James, ‘First-Stick Success'

At St. James, ‘First-Stick Success'
<span>Local medical patients should expect to benefit from recently added technology that makes blood draws easier. St. James Hospital announced Wednesday that is has implemented the AccuVein vein visualization system, designed to improve first-stick success and reduce patient pain. The purchase was made possible through proceeds raised at the recent &ldquo;Friends Fore St. James&rdquo; golf tournament. The Accuvein device helps healthcare professionals easily locate</span>

Hospital rolls out new vein finder technology purchased thanks to ‘Friends Fore St. James’ golf tourney funds

HORNELL — Local medical patients should expect to benefit from recently added technology that makes blood draws easier.

St. James Hospital announced Wednesday that is has implemented the AccuVein vein visualization system, designed to improve first-stick success and reduce patient pain. The purchase was made possible through proceeds raised at the recent “Friends Fore St. James” golf tournament.

The Accuvein device helps healthcare professionals easily locate the best vein for venipuncture procedures, such as to start an IV or to perform a blood draw.

“It is a highly effective system,” said Cassie Whitney, St. James education coordinator. “You simply point the device at the skin and click to display the peripheral veins beneath. The infrared technology ‘lights up’ the veins, making them much easier to find.”

Venipuncture is the most common invasive medical procedure worldwide, with an estimated 2.7 million procedures conducted every day in the U.S. alone. Studies reveal that up to one-third of attempts to access a vein fail the first time, creating unnecessary patient pain and discomfort. Improving first-stick attempts is a major goal for healthcare providers.

“People often say they feel like a pincushion when getting an IV started, and the technology we now use at St. James will be a welcome relief,” said Whitney. Staff in the progressive care, emergency, and pre-operative units will use the portable Accuvein system.

Even experienced healthcare professionals can have difficulty accessing veins safely and quickly the first time. Accuvein will be especially helpful with patients who are dehydrated, obese, have low body temperature, whose veins roll, or who have had frequent venipuncture during treatments.

Venipuncture is the most common invasive medical procedure worldwide, with an estimated 2.7 million procedures conducted every day in the U.S. alone.

Source: Industry figures

“The Infusion Nurses Society now recommends the use of vein visualization technology such as Accuvein in their standards of practice,” said Melissa Rackmil, St. James chief nursing officer. “This is one more major step we are taking at St. James to implement evidence-based practices that improve patient outcomes and the overall care experience.”

The purchase of the Accuvein system was made possible through proceeds raised at the Aug. 2 “Friends Fore St. James” golf tournament.

“We are delighted to be able to fund this $15,000 equipment,” said Linda Blauers, St. James foundation director. “Participation in our annual golf tournament is a major way that the community can directly help patients at St. James, and we thank all of the players, sponsors and volunteers who made this year’s event a great success.”

Providing the highest quality of care and an excellent patient experience for each and every patient are our top priorities at St. James, said Rackmil.

“Making a difference while providing the best care is why we go to work every day, and the AccuVein device will make a difference in allowing us to improve how we deliver the highest level of care. This is going to be good for the nursing staff, but even better for our patients.”

Early next year, St. James is scheduled to open its new hospital — a two-story, 87,300 square feet building on Seneca Road North adjacent to the UR Medicine St. James Medical Office Building (MOB) that opened in December 2018, a major expansion in medical services for Hornell area a residents. Hospital officials said St. James is focused on continuously improving the way care is delivered locally.

“This includes the acquisition of new technology and expertise that make care delivery safer, more comfortable and more efficient. This allows us to offer new and advanced services, so that patients don’t have to travel long distances to receive the highest level of care,” the hospital said in a statement to The Spectator.

Source: www.eveningtribune.com